Former Arsenal striker Kevin Campbell has said Arteta’s inexperience at the highest level would count against him if he should be appointed as the Arsenal manager.

Arteta, who captained Arsenal from 2013 until his retirement in 2016 has been mooted to replace the long serving former Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger, who announced he would be stepping down at the helm of affairs at the club towards the end of last season.

Since his retirement in 2016, Arteta has been serving as one of Guardiola’s back room staff members in Man City.

With Arteta said to be the favourite of landing the Arsenal managerial, Campbell, who represented Arsenal from 1988 to 1995 said the Spaniard international would be a gamble for the club.

“He is a gamble obviously considering he’s not managed a club, in the club of the stature of Arsenal,” Campbell told Sky Sports.

Campbell adds that he does not see Arteta been saddled with the off field activities, as the board would rather prefer charging him only with on pitch activities.

“… I don’t think he will conduct all the managerial duties. He will conduct the football duties.” Campbell said.

 

Latest on Arsenal managerial post

Former PSG and Sevilla manager, Unai Emery today, as emerged as a frontrunner to emerge as the new Arsenal manager.

Reports have it that the Spaniard will meet the Arsenal board today over the possibility of becoming the new Arsenal manager.

With Arteta said to have been bemused by the type of new structure at Arsenal – with the board said to be in total control of Arsenal’s transfers, Emery, who had work under same structure has been reported to be a frontrunner for the vacant  job.

Published in International Watch

There’s always much anticipation over the final day of each season when the fixture lists are released; the potential for last-day drama and season-changing results has always been one to look forward to. However, there is rarely anything to look forward to on the final days of recent Premier League seasons, just a case of dotting the I’s, crossing the T’s, the expected goodbyes and those who already on the beach.

Despite the early discomfort, Liverpool were always going to beat Middlesbrough on the final day of last season to seal fourth; Hull were always unlikely to beat Manchester United and survive in 2015; Manchester City were not going to have problems against West Ham to win the title in 2014; while only the foolhardy, in the guise of brave, would have gone for Arsenal not to beat Newcastle a year earlier. So, it’s not completely out of touch to say there’s been no real final day drama since Sergio Aguero swung his right foot in the 94th minute against Queens Park Rangers in 2012; that these days the final days of the season are like those meetings where you tap your foot in a fit of impatient boredom, while looking at your watch and waiting it all to end, with a message of ‘see you later’.

Following the midweek’s drama, scrappy goals and dogged defending, there is next-to-nothing to play for in the final round of matches for the Premier League season. Mathematically, there’s still a top four race, with Liverpool only two points ahead of Chelsea. But the Reds would have to lose to nothing-to-play-for Brighton for them to be leapfrogged, and in truth, the Blues are the likelier of both sides to lose, as they travel to Newcastle, where they haven’t won in seven years.

There’s also mathematical room for drama at the bottom end of the table, involving Southampton and Swansea City. But after the Saints’ narrow win in South Wales on Tuesday, Mark Hughes; side are three points above the 17th-placed Swans, with a superior. That means there has to be a 10-goal swing, Southampton would have to lose heavily at home to Manchester City, while, perhaps even more unlikely, Swansea would have to at least score against Stoke.

The definitely-wont-happen scenarios means the final day is set to be for goodbyes. None bigger than Arsene Wenger, who will manage Arsenal for the last time at Huddersfield, after 22 years. For the hosts, it might not be as headline-grabbing as Wenger’s, but they’ll say goodbye to midfielder Dean Whitehead, who’s retiring, and it’s bound to be a party mood, with the Terriers already safe from the relegation trapdoor. Yaya Toure made his 316th, and final, home appearance for Manchester City on Wednesday, and is another player that’ll be waved goodbye this weekend; while Everton’s trip to West Ham might well be Wayne Rooney’s last in the Premier League.

Wenger is unlikely to be the only managerial final act this weekend; Watford may well part ways with Javi Gracia, this might be Antonio Conte’s final league outing as Chelsea boss, Claude Puel is likely to bid Leicester farewell after their match at Spurs, while Everton fans will be hoping that West Ham game is Sam Allardyce’s last. There’ll also be collective goodbyes, with Stoke and West Brom, as well as Swansea (surely), bidding the top-flight goodbye for at least a year.

The expected absence of drama means the farewells will be the talking points of this final weekend, but who knows, maybe a surprise might come our way. Perhaps Brighton snatch an early lead at Anfield to make things interesting; maybe Swansea get wind that Man City are 11-1 up at Southampton with little time left. But the likelihood is that we’d all sit in a lack of anticipation, tapping our feet and looking at the time, until we bid the Prem. another unglamorous exit.

Fixtures

Burnley v Bournemouth

Crystal Palace v West Brom

Newcastle v Chelsea

Manchester United v Watford

Liverpool v Brighton

Huddersfield v Arsenal

Southampton v Manchester City

Swansea v Stoke

Tottenham v Leicester

West Ham v Everton

Published in International Watch

The end of the season: such a routine time, where the expected play themselves out: some teams reveal kits for the new season (yes, you, Everton), Manager XYZ says he’s leaving club XYZ at the close of the campaign, a tearful farewell follows the departure of a long-serving cult hero at a club, and Real Madrid win the Champions League (just typical).

Oh, right, and also, supposed writers run out of gas and opt to take a look at those Premier League players who might well switch clubs at the end of the season (or June 30 in Football-Managerish). It’s the ti…errr.. like I said, out of gas. So, straight to it then. Who are those players you could just about bet on to switch clubs after the season is read its last rites?

Arsenal

It’s likely there’ll be a raft of changes at the Emirates come the end of the season, the biggest one being the departure of Arsene Wenger. After 22 years, the French gaffer will call time on his Arsenal tenure at the end of the campaign, and it’s not unlikely that some players will also depart. Jack Wilshere’s contract runs out at the end of the season, as does the recuperating Santi Cazorla (although there’s an option of a one-year extension for him), while there are rumours linking Hector Bellerin with a move away. And with a new manager coming in, there’s expected to be a squad shake-up. No rest for the Arsenal revolving door in the summer, then.

Bournemouth

With first team opportunities hard to come by lately, Artur Boruc might well move on at the end of his contract in the summer. Harry Arter remains linked with the exit door, the rumours putting West Ham in front of the queue. Marc Pugh and Rhoys Wiggins are also out of contract at the end of the season.

Brighton

There’s always a worry for the Seagulls that bigger guns might come calling for Pascal Gross, who has been involved in 44% of the team’s goals in the Premier League this season. Liam Rosenior and Steve Sidwell will have no contracts once the season ends, and are likely to be moved on. Same might go for Niki Maenpaa and Uwe Hunemeier.

Burnley

There’s the big Burnley conundrum in terms of who’ll be in goal next season. Tom Heaton is arguably the best English goalkeeper in the league, but having been side-lined for most of this season, his deputy in Nick Pope hasn’t done too badly, even managing to force his way into World Cup contention. Both are good for number one spots at club level, and come next term, it’s likely one would move in search of it. Stephen Ward and Dean Marney are out of contract soon, while Scott Arfield has already agreed to join Rangers (no, not the one in Enugu).

Chelsea

It’s not Chelsea if there’s no forthcoming change for a new season once an old one is coming to a close, and this term looks to be no different.  Antonio Conte looks as likely to stay at Stamford Bridge next season as pigs are to fly, Chelsea are reportedly in talks with other managers already, and this- coupled with the fact that Champions League football for the next campaign is unlikely, means changes to the playing staff as well. David Luiz has spent most of this season- injury or otherwise- out of the team, Danny Drinkwater’s time at the club looks to be coming to an end, and it remains to be seen whether Tiemoue Bakayoko would get another season to get into shape, while backup goalkeepers Willy Caballero and Eduardo are out of contract in the summer. The big question is whether Eden Hazard would stick around for a second season with European elite football in three years. One thing’s for certain, though: there’ll be lots of loanees, as always.

Crystal Palace

Palace’s problematic position for the past couple of years has been in goal, with the men between the sticks having rarely convinced. All three are about to be out of contract, though, as Julian Speroni, Wayne Hennessey and Diego Cavalieri are bound to be free agents by the end of the season (although Vicente Guaita is due to join from Getafe). There’s also bound to be a hairy transfer window for the Eagles, with Wilfred Zaha likely to be subject of speculation, while there’s uncertainty surrounding Christian Benteke- even if he has said he intends to stay. Joel Ward, James McArthur, Bakary Sako, Lee Chung-Yong, Damien Delaney, Yohan Cabaye and Martin Kelly are also out of contract soon (I know right, too long).

Everton

There’s bound to be another busy summer for the Toffees, not least in terms of the exit door, likely starting with manager Sam Allardyce himself. The likes of Sandro Ramirez, Davy Klaassen and Cuco Martina are likely to be moved on after just a season, while fans would pay to drive Ashley Williams away. Joel Robles becomes a free agent once the season ends.

Huddersfield

Errr…. Not much to talk about here. Dean Whitehead and Rob Green are soon to become free agents, but (not to sound mean) who’d really miss them? Aaron Mooy might attract clubs in the summer. 

Leicester

Goalkeeper Ben Hamer runs out of contract at the end of the season, as does Robert Huth, who’s been out of the side this season thanks to a combination of injury and Harry Maguire. Riyad Mahrez has reportedly revoked his transfer request, but his case is still tagged under ‘remains to be seen’. Currently out on loan players Leo Ulloa, Islam Slimani, and long-serving Andy King are likely to also move on. As is customary at the time of the season, Claude Puel is reportedly likely to be dismissed.

Liverpool

The big transfer issue for Liverpool, since Philippe Coutinho said bye, has been Emre Can, who runs out of contract in the summer. The injured German is under Juventus’ radar, and there have been reports of a deal being signed with the Italian club. The right-back position looks rather clogged, and one of Nathaniel Clyne, Joe Gomez, and Trent Alexander-Arnold might well move on, something Daniel Sturridge would also be considering. James Milner and Alberto Moreno can also leave on a free at the end.

Manchester City

Who’d wanna leave? Okay, Yaya Toure has confirmed his departure at the end of the season, while loanee Eliaquim Mangala’s contract runs out. Joe Hart would also return from his temporary stint at West Ham, but surely be on the way out again.

Manchester United

Luke Shaw, Luke Shaw, Luke Shaw, Luke Shaw, Luke Shaw. The young left-back has been subject of some finger-pointing by manager Jose Mourinho, and there wouldn’t be a shortage of clubs coming in for English defender, who’s departure from Old Trafford seems inevitable. Michael Carrick retires at the end of the season, Anthony Martial remains linked with the exit door, while Marouane Fellaini’s contract issue remains unresolved. Matteo Darmian and Daley Blind are also bound to leave. Have I mentioned Luke Shaw?

Newcastle

Most of the Magpies’ squad is still comprised of their Championship side, even if some of them don’t appear on the pitch. Much depends on whether or not players arrive, although the likes of fringe players in Jesus Gamez, Curtis Good and Massadio Haidara, as well as loanee Tim Krul, are all out of contract at the season’s close.

Southampton

The future of a few players, and perhaps the manager, depends on whether the Saints can avoid the drop (which is likely), while Sofiane Boufal is likely to move after his exile by Mark Hughes. Jeremy Pied and Stuart Taylor are soon to no longer have contracts.

Stoke City

With relegation having been confirmed, clear-outs are not unlikely. Xherdan Shaqiri is unlikely to follow the club to the Championship, same goes for Joe Allen (picture Brendan Rodgers in Glasgow with open arms). Glenn Johnson, Jakob Haugaard, Stephen Ireland and Charlie Adam all run out of contracts soon, but dropping them a tier might make the team reconsider.

Swansea City

Another side whose players’ futures might hinge on whether or not they go down, although Alfie Mawson is likely to have a busy summer no matter what. The likes of Martin Olsson and especially Lukasz Fabianski are bound to move on should relegation be the case, while Ki Sung-Yeung is out of contract and has been linked with AC Milan, while long-serving veterans Leon Britton and Angel Rangel are also soon to be free agents.

Tottenham

It’s the stuff of mini-battles at Tottenham, with the likes of Danny Rose and Toby Alderweireld seemingly on the losing side of off-the-pitch tussles with manager Mauricio Pochettino. Both have a fair amount of suitors, and both are likely to be moved on. There are also rumours of Mousa Dembele and Victor Wanyama leaving, while Fernando Llorente might consider the exit door considering the (lack of) playing he has had. Backup goalie Michel Vorm is soon to be out of contract.

Watford

It’s not Watford if you don’t expect change at the end of the season. Manager Javi Gracia only arrived in January (on an 18-month contract), yet there are more than a few suggestions that he might be shown the door once the season reaches its close, especially with their usual end-of-season form. Any potential managerial change is always likely to lead to changes in the playing staff as well, so expect departures as well as arrivals- some Hornets fans might bite your hand off for the opportunity to drive away the inconsistent Etienne Capoue. Miguel Britos is out of contract at the end of the campaign.

West Brom

With relegation now sealed, there’s going to be changes at the Hawthorns, beginning with the managerial post. Ben Foster has declared his intention to stay even in the Championship, but clubs are surely going to come for defender Johnny Evans; Salomon Rondon has done his reputation little harm, and will lure admirers, while the likes of Nacer Chadli and Jay Rodriguez might remain in the top-flight with someone else. Chris Brunt might stick around, but his contract is currently due to expire at the season’s end, same goes for Gareth Barry, James Morrison, Gareth McAuley, Claudio Yacob and Boaz Myhill.

West Ham

If the fans had their way, the changes would begin from the boardroom. They might well settle for the departure of manager David Moyes, whose short-term contract runs out at the end of the season. Same applies for James Collins and Patrice Evra, the latter of whom is unlikely to get any renewal. Expect Robert Snodgrass to depart almost as soon as he returns from his loan at Aston Villa.

Published in International Watch

It wasn’t so much as being nervy, but rather occupying a convoy of nerves at the St. Mary’s, as Southampton managed to stumble over the finish line against Bournemouth. The win was a narrow as it was vital, the performance as irrelevant afterwards, as it was shaky during; the air punches from Mark Hughes and his assistant at the final whistle, along with the sighs of joy and relief from the players summed it up: Southampton still have life in them.

This South Coast derby had been a must-win for the Saints, after a torrid of form in the league- no wins since February prior to this. There had been close calls, a 3-2 defeat at Arsenal where the Saints spirit and commitment yielded plaudits but no points, a 3-2 defeat at home to Chelsea where their impressive start was replaced by a horrific conclusion as they threw away a two-goal advantage; there had also been insipid displays; from the 3-0 loss in Hughes’ first game, at West Ham, to the 3-0 loss in Mauricio Pellegrino’s last, at Newcastle.

But every battle has a turning point if things are primed to still end well, every war its twist of fate that shows there might just be salvation after all, and perhaps this is the Saints’ Normandy moment, their Battle of Gettysburg situation. Two goals from Dusan Tadic was enough for victory over the Cherries on Saturday…well, two goals at the attacking end, at least. At the other end, there was a combination of brave and gutsy defending, mixed with desperate and nervous defending, as well as a few good saves from goalkeeper Alex McCarthy (one of which was a blinder in stoppage time to keep out Josh King’s deflected effort). The football was hardly mind-blowing, the fans were edgy, and the players had their fair share of tiredness, but they held on nevertheless.

That big win became even bigger considering the state of results of elsewhere. When the Saints were hanging on against Bournemouth, fellow relegation battlers Huddersfield were succumbing to Everton at the John Smith’s stadium. The Terriers had gone into that game with a chance of virtually gaining survival, but a 2-0 loss, where they lacked any sort of invention going forward and didn’t look like scoring even if the entire Toffees squad got hypnotised, now leaves them just three points above Southampton, who are in 18th. That’s the first point to note for David Wagner’s team, the second is that their final three games are against Manchester City, Chelsea and Arsenal, two of those away from home. The celebrations at the end of that win against Watford a fortnight ago sent a message, the lack of one at the end of this defeat sent another.

The relegation battle story of this weekend doesn’t end with those two, as before Huddersfield and Southampton took the pitch for their respective games, Stoke City had gone to Anfield and claimed a point. It was an expected backs against the wall game for Paul Lambert’s side, but perhaps the result wasn’t as predicted, the Potters sharing the spoils after an impressive display at the back. The reality is that it’s still no wins in 12 for the Potters, and they’re still 19th having played a game more than their rivals around the drop zone, but this could well be a big point, especially considering one of their final two games is against Swansea.

Swansea would also face Southampton before the season runs out, and this weekend, despite their second half performance, they fell to defeat at Chelsea. A frustrating evening for Carlos Carvalhal leaves his side just a point above the drop zone. That home game against Southampton in the penultimate will be vital.

West Ham, meanwhile, are only two points off Swansea, and by extension three from Southampton. They also have a rather terrible goal difference, not aided by their loss at home to Manchester City, which made them the worst defence in the league so far this season. Brighton, who drew at Burnley, may be two points further forward, but aren’t quite safe yet, especially as they end the season with a home game against Manchester United, as well as trips to Liverpool and Manchester City.

This long slog looks like playing out right to the wire.

Five-star Eagles

One team that’s probably safe are Crystal Palace, who, amidst the battles going on elsewhere, were putting five past Leicester City on Saturday. There was a first goal at home for Christian Benteke in just about a year, while the likes of Ruben Loftus-Cheek and (of course) Wilfred Zaha came to the party, which was almost literal at the end of it. Palace haven’t lost against a side currently in the bottom half since September, Palace have the best goal difference in the bottom half, Palace are three points off the top ten. This was the same side that were goalless and pointless in October.

Elsewhere

  • It was a brilliant reception for Arsene Wenger as he walked on to Old Trafford for the final time, before receiving an award from Sir Alex Ferguson, and even (yes, really) sharing a smile with Jose Mourinho. At the end of it, there was no smile on his face, as his youthful side came close to grabbing a point at Old Trafford, but his last league game at the Theatre of Dreams succumbed to Fergie Time; how fitting. Arsenal still haven’t managed an away point in 2018; how worrying.
  • That West Ham loss to Man City, means City are now seven points away from a century of Premier League points in a season, as well as two goals away from the Premier League record of 103 in a season (by Chelsea in 2009/10). They have more goals in the first half of games, than West Ham have over 90 minutes.
  • Having looked doomed all season, suddenly West Brom won’t go down. Their win at Newcastle means they’re not mathematically relegated, yet. It also means they are unbeaten in four games under Darren Moore. They’ve won two games in that time, Tony Pulis and Alan Pardew combined for three league wins in nine months.
  • On the Chelsea win at Swansea, it’s finally 50 up in the Prem. for Cesc Fabregas at last. More pressingly, should Chelsea win all their remaining three games, they might finish in the top four.
  • And Mohammed Salah scored for Liv… oh, hang on. He didn’t (!). He even missed a sitter in Liverpool’s goalless draw with Stoke (what!!!).

Results

Southampton 2-1 Bournemouth

Burnley 0-0 Brighton

Manchester United 2-1 Arsenal

Crystal Palace 5-0 Leicester

West Ham 1-4 Manchester City

Newcastle 0-1 West Brom

Huddersfield 0-2 Everton

Swansea 0-1 Chelsea

Liverpool 0-0 Stoke

Monday Night Football: Tottenham v Watford

Published in International Watch

And the end of the road isn’t so far now. It was barely a week ago that Arsene Wenger announced that this season would be his last at the club, and from the next campaign, for the first time in 22 years, the answer to the question ‘who’s Arsenal’s manager?’ wouldn’t be the Frenchman. As expected, the inevitable praises and reminiscing over his time at the club have been pouring in. From journalists, fellow managers, current and former players, both for and against. Not least of them a tweet from ex-Manchester United man Gary Neville, who mentioned facing Arsenal in the Wenger era and the difficulty that posed.

And so, in a way, it’s quite fitting that one of Le Professeur’s final games before he walks off to the sunset would be at Old Trafford, and, as destiny would have it, against Jose Mourinho. The old adversary will be the last manager Wenger faces in the Old Trafford dugout before calling time on his, however sour the latter of part seems to have been, illustrious adventure with the Gunners, a ground that has held a few unforgettable memories for the 68-year-old.

It was at Old Trafford that Wenger suffered that infamous 8-2 defeat in August of 2011; at Old Trafford that he watched United become champions in 2009, seven years after he and his Arsenal team were also confirmed kings of the land at the Theatre of Dreams. It was at the same stadium he stood in the stands, arms aloft in a fit of ‘it’s just me’ almost a decade ago; where that famous pizza-gate incident happened in 2005, where his team were trampled 6-1 in 2000, and where Arsenal won to take momentum on their way to title triumph in 1998.

The Arsenal v United games, especially between the late ‘90s and 2005, were as pivotal as they were fiercely-contested. From the touchline squabble between Wenger and Sir Alex Ferguson, the dressing room and pitch tussles between players (yes, this is you, Roy Keane and Patrick Vieira), to the silverware on offer, it was the quite the series. But even after everything changed, the players, even the stadium, even when Fergie himself retired, there was still a constant in the fixture. Now that constant is about to change.

There isn’t much, in terms of the league, riding on this game; United can’t be champions and can’t dropout of the top four, while Arsenal, with the top four a bridge too far, are more interested in their Europa League affairs, where they have a second leg at Atletico waiting four days after this game. So the focus is likely to be on Wenger. How would the home fans welcome the Frenchman? What would the exchange between he and Mourinho be like? Would he finally win away at a Mourinho team before bowing out? With the likelihood of a reshuffled side as a result of their European commitments, that last part might seem unlikely, but this is a fixture that hasn’t wanted for twists and turns, one of this weekend’s being Alexis Sanchez hosting his former club.

And with that point it is worth noting that there will be more plot twists and drama in this fixture for years to come, the trend has already been set. But when the final whistle goes on Sunday, when Wenger walks down that path for the last time and into the tunnel, one of the men who have helped set the tone for this glamorous story between these rivals will be bidding it goodbye. Before that, though, he still has another chapter to star in.

Elsewhere:

  • It’s gone from ‘win or bust’ stage to ‘win-but-even-that-might-not-be-enough-because-you-left-it-late’ stage for Stoke, as the Potters know the water is hastily running dry as they seek to swim to the other side of the dotted line. Paul Lambert’s side will just about need to win the rest of their remaining fixtures to have a chance of survival. First, a trip to Anfield, where they haven’t won in 54 top-flight fixtures, and are bound to be up against probably the deadliest front three in Europe right now. Good luck with that one.
  • Speaking of last chance saloon, Southampton are in a not-so dissimilar situation. The past few weeks have been plaudits-not-points for the Saints, who are running out of time and games. The upcoming South Coast derby is a definite must-win, perhaps it’s time for some more attacking displays.
  • It’s shades of Southampton again for Claude Puel: the results are drying up, the boos are ringing, complaints have come about his training sessions, and the board are considering replacing him in the summer. He and Leicester need three points at Crystal Palace, or, with games against Tottenham and Arsenal to come, their season might just peter out, and someone might just be ringing Mauricio Pellegrino.
  • And Burnley can cement a European place with as much as a point at home to Brighton. Nine months on, and it’s still incredible.

Fixtures

Manchester United v Arsenal

Tottenham v Watford

Swansea v Chelsea

Liverpool v Stoke

Southampton v Bournemouth

Huddersfield v Everton

Burnley v Brighton

West Ham v Manchester City

Newcastle v West Brom

Crystal Palace v Leicester

Published in International Watch

 

 

Granit Xhaka was signed in the summer of 2016 for £35m but the Frimpong has insisted that the Swiss international was not good enough for the Arsenal team.

 

Emmanuel Frimpong has said that Granit Xhaka and several other players in the Arsenal set up should not have been in the club.

 

Though confessing that even someone with the quality of Frimpong is not good enough for his former side, the 26-year-old said Arsenal needed to sign more aggressive players, as the club have not done well enough in replacing someone like Gilberto Silva.

 

The Ghanian international, who is unhappy with the current state at Arsenal said also that the players rather than the manager should be blamed for Arsenal woes.

 

“I’m still a fan and I think it’s too easy just to blame the manager,” Frimpong told Telegraph UK.

 

“This group of players is just not good enough, simple as that. I don’t think [Granit] Xhaka, for instance, is good enough for Arsenal.

 

“I point out that it’s a decade since Gilberto Silva left Arsenal, and with Xhaka struggling there is still a gaping hole in the defensive midfield area. So, could Arsenal do with someone like Frimpong?

 

“They do need players with a more aggressive mentality,” he says. “If Arsenal signed aggressive players, there would be a big difference because how many real fighters are there in the team? 

 

“They don’t need me, though. Trust me, Arsenal would be worse off with Frimpong.”

 

In the interview, Frimpong also talked about          some of his time at Arsenal – best friend, most disliked player biggest dark horse and many others.        

 

Best manager - Arsene Wenger: "As a young guy he's the best manager that you could possibly ever have."

 

Most disliked player - Samir Nasri: "He's an idiot that I would never ever have respect for."

 

Worst trainer - Andrey Arshavin: "He was terrible in training, always laboured, very relaxed. But very good on the day of the game."

 

Biggest dark horse - Aaron Ramsey: "I went to bed one night thinking: 'He's having girls thrown at him and doesn't even want them. I want to be like Ramsey'."

 

Worst hair - Gervinho: "Definitely not a ladies man. I had a better chance of getting more ladies than Gervinho. Terrible hair and terrible hairline. Must be the weirdest hairline in football."

 

Funniest team-mate - Alex Song: "He used to go to KFC before every home game. On the bus to the team hotel the night before the game he would be eating chicken nuggets."

 

Nicest team-mate - Cesc Fabregas: "Such a lovely guy. When I got moved up to the first team, he came up to me and said 'Frimpong, you’ve been promoted, well done!'"

 

Best team-mate - Santi Cazorla: "Santi was completely two-footed and totally unique, so small, perfect technique. Everything was absolutely brilliant. He caught my eye as soon as he joined. In training, he was playing with his left foot and his right, and I was like 'wow'".

 

Oldest friend in football - Jack Wilshere: "I've known him since we were nine and he is honestly so good. He was so good that when he started playing for the first team or was treated differently, everyone understood."

 

Himself: "Follow Frimpong and you'll never ever get bored. There's always something. It's better to watch me than CNN."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published in International Watch

For the second season in a row, there’s no springtime doom and gloom at Newcastle. No talk of fans rallying with banners demanding a club that tries, no claim of the players letting down the fans, and no sign of a squad underachieving. Tyneside feels alive and buoyant, smiles are on faces fans, and the team is overachieving by sitting in the top half.

‘It’s very good what is happening in this club, in this city. We are where we deserve to be, I think’, said Mohammed Diame, who put in a man of the match of performance as Newcastle came from behind to beat Arsenal. Yes, Newcastle beat Arsenal. After 10 defeats in a row, spanning six years, and no wins against the Gunners in eight years, the Magpies grabbed a completely deserved win, their fourth in a row, as well their fourth successive home win. ‘With the last four results, we’ve won four games in a row now, and confidence is high’, said defender Paul Dummett.

And there was no shortage of confidence, even when Arsenal took the lead. It had been 13 years since the Toon celebrated a home win over Arsenal, Nolberto Solano bagging the solo goal back in the winter of 2005. Then Alan Shearer and Michael Owen were the headline men up front, Rafa Benitez was managing at Liverpool, with Glenn Roeder in charge. Normally Newcastle heads would have dropped, conceding the first goal against a bogey team and that familiar feeling would start to creep in, of those 10 games in a row that they lost to the Gunners, only in one of them did they score equalisers- yet they were hit 7-3 in that one- so perhaps a shot in morale would have been expected the moment Alexandre Lacazette latched on to Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s pass, and became the first player to score against Martin Dubravka at the St. James Park this season.

But dropping heads isn’t quite a feature of the new Toon, not what has made punch above their weight, made them win four games on the bounce. This may have been a shuffled Arsenal side, but there’s no discrediting Newcastle’s resolve. ‘People were talking about the changes they made but you could see the quality which they had, especially in the first half’, said Benitez. For quality, Benitez would have been delighted to see that that was the word surrounding his side’s equaliser. From Jonjo Shelvey’s superb pass, to Deandre Yedlin’s one-time cross, and Ayoze Perez’s one-touch finish, the goal that gave Newcastle parity involved eight of their 11 players, with nine passes.

It was a third goal in as many games for an in-form Perez, who bagged winners against Huddersfield, and at Leicester lately, but it’s the Spaniard’s work ethic that has been his most brilliant characteristic, and that has also been the watchwords for the rest of the squad. That work ethic, not so similar with Newcastle’s Premier League teams in recent past, always accused of a lack of trying and giving up too easily in the past. Not this side. ‘Everyone was pulling in the same direction…’ said Benitez, while Dummett pointed out ‘the organisation between the back four and midfield’ as key. But perhaps bigger proof of their hard work and focus is Diame pointing out that the team would enjoy this ‘for a few days, then get back to work’. There’s no room for resting on laurels, no room for slacking off, as they showed in the second half, with Islam Slimani and Perez combining to play in Ritchie, who- just like he did against Manchester United here- grabbed the winner.

With 41 points, Newcastle are one point behind ninth-placed Everton, whom they face next. ‘We’ll go to Everton hoping to beat them and take over them’ Dummett added. A win at Goodison Park next weekend takes them to ninth place; only twice in the past 11 Premier League seasons have they finished higher. Not that Benitez is one to get carried away, it’s still a case of one step at a time. The first step was always survival, and with 41 points that has been achieved, just ask Dummett. ‘Yes, definitely’.

City kings of the land, inevitably

You could excuse the nerves from the Manchester City fans and manager when Tottenham halved their advantage. City had been on top and took a deserved- yet fortuitous- two-goal lead, until Christian Eriksen pulled a goal back for Spurs (insert Harry Kane joke here). There was semblance to City’s implosion at home to Manchester United the previous weekend, and Spurs sensed it, the fans roaring them on while the players forced City to cede the ball, both at the end of the first half, and the start of the second. But City didn’t give up control or their lead this time, and with less than 20 minutes left, Raheem Sterling- guilty of a few misses in the derby and here as well- put the game to bed. City have won at Chelsea, Arsenal, United and Spurs this season; more importantly they got to within touching distance of the title. A West Brom win at Old Trafford would suffice.

Not that Pep Guardiola was watching, though. The City boss was presumably on the golf course when United took on West Brom, laboured at home to the bottom club, and, courtesy of a Jay Rodriguez header, suffered a second home league defeat of the season to hand City the title. Which means United had delayed City’s coronation at the Etihad on derby day, only to gift them the title by losing to a side that had won only twice in the league all season. Sums up this week of football. This also means City have won the league at the joint-fastest time ever (with five games to spare, just like United in 2000-01), and in seven years they’ve won three league titles, half the number of times United manager Jose Mourinho pointed out that he has won eight career championships in his post-match conference.

Elsewhere:

  • That defeat at St. James means Arsenal are yet to record an away point in 2018, the only side in the top four divisions in the country awaiting their first spoil on the road. Incredible.
  • Now it’s five wins in a row for Burnley. Not only did Sean Dyche’s side put some considerable daylight between them and recent opponents Leicester, they are now only two points behind sixth-placed Arsenal.
  • Mohammed Salah scored. Next!!
  • The jubilation was uncontainable, from the pitch to the dugout and the fans, when the goal went in and at the final whistle. It looked like Huddersfield-Watford would peter out to a goalless draw, until Tom Ince popped up for the Terriers in the 91st minute, his fifth goal against Watford. More Importantly, it has them on 35 points, on the brink of survival.
  • And in the crisis Clasico, Southampton managed to toss a two-goal lead at home to Chelsea, and grab defeat from the cusp of victory.
  • Oh, and welcome back to the big time Wolverhampton Wanderers

Results:

Newcastle 2-1 Arsenal

Tottenham 1-3 Manchester City

Southampton 2-3 Chelsea

Manchester United 0-1 West Brom

Huddersfield 1-0 Watford

Swansea 1-1 Everton

Crystal Palace 3-2 Brighton

Liverpool 3-0 Bournemouth

Burnley 2-1 Leicester

Monday Night Football: West Ham v Stoke

Published in International Watch

 

The former Arsenal midfielder labels fellow teammate at the club, Samir Nasri as the only enemy he has in football.

 

The Ghanaian international who joined Arsenal as a nine-year-old in an interview with Telegraph UK, revealed that Nasri, who hostilely left Arsenal in 2011 was a big critic of him while the two were still at the club.

 

The 26 years old, who has been without a club since January, said the problem he had with Nasri started in a game against Liverpool at the Emirate in the 2011-12 season where silly bookable offences from him led to Arsenal eventually losing the game 2-0 – with the score still tie before the 70th minute when he was tie.

 

Frimpong narrating his ordeal in the hands of the Frenchman, said while his former manager Arsene Wenger was calm with him after his mistakes had cost the side three points, Nasri did attack him after the game.

 

He said: “When the game ended, we were in the dressing room and I expected [Arsene] Wenger to be really angry, He was actually very calm.

 

“But for some reason Nasri came in and he was like: ‘We lost the game because of you’. I was a young guy, didn’t really know what I was doing, and was devastated. I felt like I’d let everybody down and he was really blaming me, so I really didn’t like him.

 

“He always had a go at me if I gave the ball away in training and even said to me once: ‘I could buy you if I want’. To be honest, he probably could have done at the time, but still.”

 

Nasri, who later moved to Manchester City in same summer of the 2011-12 season for £25m returned to Emirates Stadium three months after he attacked Frimpong, and the Ghanaian revealed the reason the two of them fought many a times in that particular game was simply because of his dislike for the Frenchman.

 

“People never really understand why that [fight] happened but I don’t like the guy,” Frimpong says. “The reason I don’t like him is because he’s an idiot. Plain and simple. I would never, ever have respect for him.”

 

The hard tackling midfielder, who once accused Arsene Wenger as being a racist has revealed he regretted his action – saying “As a young guy he {Wenger} is the best manager you could ever have,”

 

Having been left out of a League Cup game against Chelsea in 2013, Frimpong tweeted, “Sometimes I wish I was White and English.”

 

The tweet ended his 13 years association with Arsenal, as he was sold to Barnsley three months later.

 

On Wenger, Frimpong said: “As a young guy he’s the best manager you could ever have. I’ve never come across another manager who’s so calm and understanding.

 

“He only shouted at me once, when I did something wrong in training after turning up late. I regret the accusation in that tweet because the man is obviously not racist.”

 

 

 

 

 

Published in International Watch

10 Potential Managerial Changes Next Season

Wednesday, 28 March 2018 15:07

This be the final quarter of the season, mateys; where leagues are won, cups are taken, relegations are suffered, and end of season awards are doled out. But not many things say the end of a season like when a manager leaves his post, either having earlier stated that he would leave when the season ends, or having made the sudden, but inevitable departure, or having been courted by bigger fish.

So what are the potential managerial changes that are foreseeable once the final whistle of the season goes? We have a look at 10…

Paris Saint-Germain

Without a shred of a doubt, it’s the first potential managerial change that many people are foreseeing, and not without reason. After last season’s early UEFA Champions League exit at the hands, alongside only second place in the domestic league, PSG went big in the market, shattering the world transfer record (for Neymar) and the second-world-transfer-record-in-form-of-a-loan (Kylian Mbappe), only to suffer another early exit. They may be coasting to the Ligue 1 title, but after Laurent Blanc was sacked following three consecutive league titles, one league crown and insipid European exits won’t cut it for Unai Emery, especially considering he was hired because of his continental previous with Sevilla. It’s hard to fashion a way to see the Spaniard remaining as manager next season, not least because his contract expires at the end of this campaign, and the French club already contacting Antonio Conte’s representatives. Which brings us nicely to….

Chelsea

It’s little gain pointing out the mood of Conte at Stamford Bridge this term, the Italian has gone from title-winning mastermind to sulky maverick in less than 12 months. Chelsea are currently lingering outside the top four, have won three league games from nine in 2018, and have their fate well out of their own hands, and Conte has spent time questioning the Blues hierarchy on several occasions, from not getting his players, to the board not fully committing to him. All the elements of an inevitable divorce.

Real Madrid

W…W...Wa…Wait!! Before you aim the stones and bring out the clubs, hear ye out. Zinedine Zidane’s success at Real Madrid so far is as much of a mean feat as it is a secret, but there’s no question Los Blancos have floundered this season. They were out of the title race as early as December, they’ve suffered more defeats than the whole of last season already and were bundled out of the Spanish Cup in their own backyard. It’s hard to ignore their resurgence since the start of the year, though, the goals have started to come in (yes, Cristiano Ronaldo) and they made light work of PSG in the Champions League last 16, but it’s in Europe where their only hope lies, and a quarter-final exit at the hands of Juventus might well spell the end for Zizou.

Bayern Munich

Another almost sure-fire change ahead of next season. Bayern have been transformed since Jupp Heynckes returned in September, and are at most two wins away from a sixth successive Bundesliga title, as well as going well in Europe. But despite the smiles on the pitch, and the appeals from chairman Karl Heinz-Rummenigge, Heynckes, 72, still remains intent on stepping down. There have been rumours of Thomas Tuchel (who is by no means done here), as well as Julian Nagelsmann, as potential replacements.

Arsenal

Call it bold, or foolhardy if you like; and perhaps it is. After all, many have had the gusto to predict the time by which Arsene Wenger would have left the Emirates, and all of them have been proved wrong. But the pressure seems unyielding and the discontent louder as each game of the season grows by, and you sense that should the Gunners lift the Europa League, Le Professeur might just finally walk off into the sunset. There have been endless rumours of Italians Max Allegri and Carlo Ancelotti as potential dugout replacements, while Thomas Tuchel’s name has come up in recent days. This might well be Wenger’s final hurrah. Just don’t bet on it yet, though.

Everton

It’s been a season of complete discomfort at the Blue end of Merseyside, despite the wave of optimism that swept it in the summer. After spending big at the start of the season, Everton were primed for a charge against the top six, even with the loss of Romelu Lukaku, while FourFourTwo even talked about them probably being among one of the potential outside challengers for the title. So, surely the fans wouldn’t have expected the Toffees to be spending most of its time trying to stave off relegation trouble, after a torrid start to the season saw Ronald Koeman sacked and Sam Allardyce replacing the Dutchman. Big Sam has just about guaranteed safety already, but there’s little for appreciation or optimism under his stewardship so far, Everton have had at least four games this season where they haven’t managed a shot on target, the performances have been laboured, and they’ve only won once away from Goodison since December. The fans have made no secret of their discontent, surely a side that was the sixth biggest spender in Europe in the summer and winter windows combined ought to play with ambition when away to Watford and West Brom, at the very least. Stranger things than Big Sam staying on next season have happened, but it’s hard to see Big Sam staying on next season.

Borussia Dortmund

Another side where the ship has steadied but the comfort isn’t quite there. Since the sacking of Peter Bosz, Peter Stoger has come in and kept things together nicely at Dortmund, Die Schwarzgelben haven’t lost in the league under his stewardship and are in a Champions League place. But there have been complaints over the football ever since the former Koln arrived, Dortmund have become harder to beat but hard to watch, and they did get beaten, in the Europa League at the hands of Red Bull Salzburg. Stoger’s exploits will have no doubt interested other sides, and done his stock no harm. Perhaps Dortmund would be glad to have someone take him off their hands.

Olympique Lyon

Exciting. That’s been the word associated with Olympique Lyonnais this campaign, the youthful exuberance of a youthful and exuberant side has been pleasing on the eye. But no doubt there would be bumps in the road, as there have been this season, recently as well. After a late win over PSG in February, Lyon were eight points behind the capital side, and seemed like outsiders for a title race. But the form nosedived after that, no wins in their next five domestic games. They were compensating for their drop in the league with a steady run in the Europa League, but at the last 16 stage they were bundled out by CSKA Moscow, denied a home final in the process, and that seemed like the boiling point. First, Benjamin Marcal didn’t take too well being substituted in that defeat at home to CSKA, a discontent he didn’t hide from coach Bruno Genesio. A verbal confrontation immediately followed, and Marcal has been exiled from the team ever since. Then there was chairman Jean Michel-Aulas denying reports that Genesio had offered his resignation before the Marseille game. A win in that encounter has kept them in the hunt for Champions League next season, and pushed the unease inside the club aside for the moment, but it’s not hard to sense that all is far from well at Lyon. Rumours of Claudio Ranieri being touted as a replacement are of little help to the issue.

West Ham

It’s fair to say that move to the London Stadium hasn’t quite had the desired effect that it was supposed to. After that impressive seventh place finish in 2015/16, better things were expected as the club moved away from the Boleyn Ground. Or perhaps following the impressive campaign of 2015/16, expectations became rather unrealistically high. Nevertheless, much was expected after the Hammers moved to the future, the seemingly next level, but little has been delivered. An underwhelming season last time out and a bad start to this one saw the axe swing on Slaven Bilic, and David Moyes was brought in as a replacement, despite the sneers from the fans. Moyes did start well, rejuvenating a previously forlorn Marko Arnautovic, but form has tailed off. Three defeats in three, with 11 goals conceded, are hardly any cause for optimism, and though most of the fans’ distaste has been spat at the direction of the owners, it’s not hard to foresee another managerial change at the East End.

West Brom

Duh!

Okay fine: Three league wins all season, one win since Alan Pardew replaced Tony Pulis in December, those aren’t the kind of stats West Brom were expecting this campaign. It’s been one mishap to another for the Baggies, from the sacking of the club directors to the oh-so-famous taxi-gate incident involving four of their players. It’s no wild guess to say that a lack of options is what’s keeping Pardew in the job; relegation is just about a certainty now. Pards surely won’t be around after.

Published in International Watch

Former Arsenal striker and now Skysports pundit has said that Alexis Sanchez arrival at Manchester United was having a negative impact on the team’s formation.

The Chilean winger Joined United in a swap deal that saw Henrikh Mkhitaryan moved to The Emirates, and the winger is said to be earning over £400,000 weekly – making him the highest paid player in the English league.

Since the sensational move to the Theatre of Dreams in January, Sanchez has played 838 minutes scoring just one goal.

And after an abysmal night at Old Trafford on Tuesday night which saw United lost 2-1 in a Champions League Round 16 tie to Sevilla, Charlie Nicholas claims Sanchez, who lost the ball on twenty occasions (making it a total of 247 since he joined Man U), has unsettled the four-time European Champions.

Nicholas told skysports "At the start of the season, Manchester United had a fluency to them. Paul Pogba played high up with Jesse Lingard behind him and Romelu Lukaku on his game.

"All of a sudden Sanchez comes, Marcus Rashford gets dropped out and Anthony Martial gets moved over. All of a sudden the whole team is getting squeezed to fit Sanchez in.

"Sanchez, at the moment, does not deserve to be in the team. It's too individual. He is giving the ball away too often

"I'm sure a lot of Manchester United fans must be looking and saying 'when is he going to do something for us?'

"He looks as though he is trying hard, but this is Manchester United and you've got to deliver on a game-by-game basis and he is not."

Nicholas added that Jose’s United that won two trophies last season were disappointing against Sevilla and looked like a team that would end the season without a silverware.

"They did not justify being anywhere close to the last eight of the Champions League. They are not going to get the title and now have got the FA Cup to play for.

"Jose rescued an average Manchester United last season to get them into the Champions League with two trophies. Now he is staring down the barrel of winning zero, he added.

 

Published in International Watch

Page 1 of 7